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  1. #11
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    MakerBot and Robohand | 3D Printing Mechanical Hands

    Published on May 8, 2013

  2. #12
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    Additive manufacturing

    Published on Sep 2, 2015

    Additive manufacturing (AM), or 3D printing, is providing game-changing capabilities for rapidly producing unique prototypes and fully functional parts including those that might otherwise be impossible. This video provides an overview of the AM capabilities APL provides that are capable of producing parts in a wide range of materials, sizes and complexities.

    Everywhere you look, there’s a new innovation made possible by the wonders of 3D printing. Here at APL, we’ve made some amazing things. But it’s not just pushing a button – it’s a process.

    It’s called additive manufacturing and it’s changed the way we design, and produce, high-value parts for a variety of projects.

    Unlike traditional subtractive methods, which remove unwanted material, additive manufacturing creates objects from 3D model data, joining materials together layer by layer.

    We start with your design and the materials you need, and build it up, a little bit at a time, until we get your finished piece. But making the really complex parts that we do, takes more than just the plans and turning on a machine.

    When you hear “3D Printing”, it’s usually low end, and low capability. Additive manufacturing is about thinking big - our high-end tools and techniques allow us to go from design to part, more quickly and efficiently than ever before. We utilize multiple processes – tailored to best suit each project.

    It means we can create complex geometries, or internal features, that would be nearly impossible with other methods. Parts can be engineered with lattice structures, or gradient materials. Our current work is primarily with polymers, but our capabilities using metal will be expanding.

    Design changes are both simple and inexpensive.

    And we ensure the properties are consistent from build-to-build, project-to-project. Through these processes we’ve been able to create some remarkable, highly customized, durable and complex parts — fast.

    Additive manufacturing gives us flexibility to modify designs to your specifications, easily. And by producing multiple parts at once, or all-in-one assemblies, we really cut down on production time.

    It’s the perfect solution for prototyping or trying multiple designs, as well as for hard-to-machine materials, or engineering lightweight structures, that are strong.

  3. #13
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    3D-printing with living organisms "could transform the food industry"

    Published on Jan 5, 2016

    Food designer Chloe Rutzerveld has developed a concept for "healthy and sustainable" 3D-printed snacks that sprout plants and mushrooms for flavour.

    Rutzerveld's Edible Growth project consists of 3D-printed shapes containing a mixture of seeds, spores and yeast, which will start to grow after only a few days.

    "Edible growth is exploring how 3D printing could transform the food industry," she says in the movie. "It is about 3D printing with living organisms, which will develop into a fully grown edible."

    Each of the basket-like 3D-printed structures, which Rutzerveld presented at Dutch Design Week 2014, contains an edible centre of agar – a gelatinous substance that enables the seeds and spores to sprout.

    As the plants and mushrooms grow, the flavour also develops, transforming into what Rutzerveld claims is a fresh, nutritious and tasty snack after only a few days.

    "As it comes out of the 3D printer you can really see the straight lines of the technology," she says. "But as it develops, you can see organic shapes. You can see the stages of growth and the development of taste and flavour."

    The aim of the project, which Rutzerveld developed in collaboration with the Eindhoven University of Technology and research organisation TNO, was to investigate ways that 3D printing could be used in the food industry.

    "By 3D printing food you can make the production chain very short, the transport will be less, there is less land needed," says Rutzerveld."But also you can experiment with new structures. You can surprise the consumer with new food and things that haven't been done before."

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    World's smallest 3D printing pen

    Published on Jun 10, 2016

    Here's a cool gadget that prints in 3D. Unlike other 3D printing pens on the market the Lix is similar in size to a standard pen.

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    The future of 3D printing

    Published on Aug 4, 2016

    What do nanobots, better water filtration, and space colonization have in common? They're all being made possible by advances in 3D Printing!

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    Food Ink World's First 3D Printing Restaurant - London Pop Up

    Published on Aug 8, 2016

    The world's first 3D restaurant had it's debut in London and if you thought that not only was the food created with 3D printers along with the glasses, plates and cutlery if that wasn't enough even the chairs were printed for the event.
    Food Inkset up for 3 days only in a Shoreditch side street to showcase the versatility of 3D printing.During the day, the pop-up was opened as something of an exhibition space for the technology, where the public could see 3D printers and pens at work, and try some 3D printed snacks. At night, the pop-up became boutique restaurant, where 10 diners per sitting paid over ?250 a head for a nine-course menu, printed during the meal while they watched.
    During the day, the pop-up was opened as something of an exhibition space for the technology, where the public could see 3D printers and pens at work, and try some 3D printed snacks. At night, the pop-up became boutique restaurant, where 10 diners per sitting paid over ?250 a head for a nine-course menu, printed during the meal while they watched.

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