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Thread: BioBots, EBICS (Emergent Behavior of Integrated Cellular Systems), Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

  1. #1

    BioBots, EBICS (Emergent Behavior of Integrated Cellular Systems), Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

    Developer - EBICS

    Introduction to EBICS Research

    To create a biological machine, EBICS teams will work with many kinds of cells, but primarily those of three types: neurons, muscle cells and endothelial cells, which make blood vessels.

  2. #2


    Bio-Bots: Cells Power Biological Machines

    Published on Nov 15, 2012

    They're soft, biocompatible, about 7 millimeters long -- and, incredibly, able to walk by themselves. Miniature "bio-bots" developed at the University of Illinois are making tracks in synthetic biology.
    "These bots were made for walking: Cells power biological machines"

    by Liz Ahlberg
    November 15, 2012

  3. #3


    Muscle-Powered Bio-Bots: Soft biological machines take a step forward

    Published on Jun 30, 2014

    From the lab of Rashid Bashir

  4. #4


    These BioBots show some real muscle - Science Nation

    Published on Mar 7, 2016

    WARNING: THIS VIDEO HAS SCENES WITH FLASHING LIGHTS.

    The tiny BioBots engineered at one NSF-funded Science and Technology Center (STC) move a bit like inchworms, but they represent giant strides in science and engineering. They can be controlled with electrical or optical signals and use muscle tissue for power.

    The mission of the STC on Emergent Behaviors of Integrated Cellular Systems (EBICS) is to develop the science and technology needed to engineer clusters of living cells. This will eventually help mankind address challenges in health, security and the environment. EBICS researchers at the forefront of this novel and multidisciplinary field are committed to sharing responsible and ethically conscious practices for forward engineering biological machines.

    Currently, researchers are focused on BioBots that mimic the body, but, perhaps one day, biological machines could replace animals for drug testing, or be used to detect and neutralize toxins in the environment or even sequester carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere.

    The research in this episode was supported by NSF award #0939511, NSF Science and Technology Center: Emergent Behaviors of Integrated Cellular Systems.

    NSF Grant URL: NSF Science and Technology Center: Emergent Behaviors of Integrated Cellular Systems

    Miles O'Brien, Science Nation Correspondent
    Marsha Walton, Science Nation Producer

  5. #5


    Musclebound “Bio-bots” move around in response to light

    Published on Mar 14, 2016

    By wrapping rings of genetically engineered mouse muscle tissue around a variety of soft 3-D printed skeletons, researchers built what they call “bioactuators” that convert energy into motion when stimulated by a specific wavelength of light.

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