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Thread: Rafael Hostettler

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    Robots with muscles: inspired by nature | Rafael Hostettler | TEDxTUM

    Published on Jul 25, 2014

    This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Can robots have muscles and brains like we humans do, and how would a future with them look like? Rafael Hostettler, PhD Student in Myorobotics at the Technical University of Munich, takes us on a fascinating journey on how an adorable humanoid robot with muscles, called Roboy, is born in 9 months, and sheds light on the future of robotics, and what kind of future it might bring us.

    Being fascinated by the complexity and beauty of everything, Rafael Hostettler always had a hard time to choose. That’s why he has an MSc. in Computational Science from ETH Zurich, where he learnt to simulate just about everything on computers, so he didn’t have to make a decision. Now he’s building robots that imitate the building principles of the human musculoskeletal system and travels the world with Roboy. The 3D printed robot boy that plays in a theatre, goes to school and captivates the audience with his fascinating stories.

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    Narrowing the gap - robots inspired by nature | Rafael Hostettler | TEDxVienna

    Published on Jan 21, 2015

    This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. In the last few centuries humanity has become extremely apt in building machines and in the last few decades, artificial intelligence has brought us very powerful algorithms to solve cognitive tasks. We’re outsmarted in games such as Chess, which many would regard as the pinnacle of reasoning, requiring years of training to obtain mastership. But at the same time, we have not been able to build a machine that can reliably lift a glass standing on a table in a room. A task that can be solved by any human, but has eluded our engineering aptitude.

    Being fascinated by the complexity and beauty of everything, Rafael Hostettler always had a hard time to choose. That’s why he has a MSc. in Computational Science from ETH Zurich, where he learnt to simulate just about everything on computers. Now he’s building robots that imitate the building principles of the human musculoskeletal system and travels the world with the 3D printed robot Roboy.

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