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Thread: Harvard Ambulatory MicroRobot (HAMR), Harvard Microrobotics Laboratory, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

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    Harvard Ambulatory MicroRobot (HAMR), Harvard Microrobotics Laboratory, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA


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    The Harvard Ambulatory MicroRobot (HAMR)

    Published on Jun 13, 2013

    The Harvard Ambulatory MicroRobot (HAMR) is a 1.3g quadrupedal robot manufactured using the PC-MEMS fabrication process and assembled using techniques inspired by pop-up books. Using six piezoelectric actuators, HAMR is capable of tethered locomotion up to 37 cm/s using a 70 Hz gait frequency. In addition, HAMR can successfully carry greater than 1.3g of additional payload, and maneuver using two simple control inputs. A previous prototype integrated power and control to demonstrate autonomous locomotion of a 1.7g walking robot.

    HAMR was developed in the Harvard Microrobotics Lab and was funded by the NSF and Wyss Institute for Biologically-Inspired Engineering.

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    Meet HAMR, the cockroach-inspired robot

    Published on Jan 30, 2018

    The Harvard Ambulatory Microrobot - nicknamed HAMR - is a versatile robot that can run at high speeds, jump, climb, turn sharply, carry payloads and fall from great distances without being injured.

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    The Power and Control Autonomous Harvard Ambulatory MicroRobot (HAMR-F)

    Published on Feb 7, 2018

    The Harvard Ambulatory MicroRobot (HAMR) is now fast, maneuverable, and fully functional outdoors without reliance on a tether. This version, HAMR-F, was recently published in IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters.

    Title: Power and Control Autonomy for High Speed Locomotion With an Insect-Scale Legged Robot

    Authors: Benjamin Goldberg, Raphael Zufferey, Neel Doshi, E. Farrell Helbling, Griffin Whittredge, Mirko Kovac, and Robert J. Wood

    At only 2.8 g and 4.5 cm in length, HAMR-F is capable of locomotion at speeds up to 17.2 cm/s (3.8 body lengths per second) with an onboard battery. There is a bidirectional wireless RF link for data communication and an onboard inertial measurement unit (IMU) provides feedback for heading control.

    HAMR-F was developed in the Harvard Microrobotics Lab and funded by the NSF, Wyss Institute for Biologically-Inspired Engineering, and the ARO DURIP program.

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    Swimming cockroach-inspired robot

    Published on Jul 2, 2018

    In nature, cockroaches can survive underwater for up to 30 minutes. Now, a robotic cockroach can do even better. Harvard’s Ambulatory Microrobot, known as HAMR, can walk on land, swim on the surface of water, and walk underwater for as long as necessary, opening up new environments for this little bot to explore.

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