Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Harvard Ambulatory MicroRobot (HAMR), Harvard Microrobotics Laboratory, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA

  1. #1

    Harvard Ambulatory MicroRobot (HAMR), Harvard Microrobotics Laboratory, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA


  2. #2


    The Harvard Ambulatory MicroRobot (HAMR)

    Published on Jun 13, 2013

    The Harvard Ambulatory MicroRobot (HAMR) is a 1.3g quadrupedal robot manufactured using the PC-MEMS fabrication process and assembled using techniques inspired by pop-up books. Using six piezoelectric actuators, HAMR is capable of tethered locomotion up to 37 cm/s using a 70 Hz gait frequency. In addition, HAMR can successfully carry greater than 1.3g of additional payload, and maneuver using two simple control inputs. A previous prototype integrated power and control to demonstrate autonomous locomotion of a 1.7g walking robot.

    HAMR was developed in the Harvard Microrobotics Lab and was funded by the NSF and Wyss Institute for Biologically-Inspired Engineering.

  3. #3

  4. #4


    Meet HAMR, the cockroach-inspired robot

    Published on Jan 30, 2018

    The Harvard Ambulatory Microrobot - nicknamed HAMR - is a versatile robot that can run at high speeds, jump, climb, turn sharply, carry payloads and fall from great distances without being injured.

  5. #5


    The Power and Control Autonomous Harvard Ambulatory MicroRobot (HAMR-F)

    Published on Feb 7, 2018

    The Harvard Ambulatory MicroRobot (HAMR) is now fast, maneuverable, and fully functional outdoors without reliance on a tether. This version, HAMR-F, was recently published in IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters.

    Title: Power and Control Autonomy for High Speed Locomotion With an Insect-Scale Legged Robot

    Authors: Benjamin Goldberg, Raphael Zufferey, Neel Doshi, E. Farrell Helbling, Griffin Whittredge, Mirko Kovac, and Robert J. Wood

    At only 2.8 g and 4.5 cm in length, HAMR-F is capable of locomotion at speeds up to 17.2 cm/s (3.8 body lengths per second) with an onboard battery. There is a bidirectional wireless RF link for data communication and an onboard inertial measurement unit (IMU) provides feedback for heading control.

    HAMR-F was developed in the Harvard Microrobotics Lab and funded by the NSF, Wyss Institute for Biologically-Inspired Engineering, and the ARO DURIP program.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 11
    Last Post: 1st February 2018, 21:05
  2. Replies: 11
    Last Post: 18th October 2017, 23:56
  3. Self-folding robots, Harvard Microrobotics Laboratory, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA
    By Airicist in forum Transforming robots, self-transforming robots, polymorphic robots, self-reconfigurable robots
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 19th July 2017, 23:32
  4. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 24th May 2016, 16:40

Социальные закладки

Социальные закладки

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •